What Is Tapioca Flour vs. Tapioca Starch | Bob’s Red Mill
What Is It? Wednesday: Tapioca Flour/Starch

What Is It? Wednesday: Tapioca Flour/Starch

Our topic this week for What Is It? Wednesday is Tapioca Flour. Whether mixed into baked goods or used as a thickening agent for soups and sauces, this ingredient can be used in a variety of different recipes. This ingredient is a tricky one to understand and there is a lot of confusing information about it online. We're going to do our best to clear it up, but if we missed something or you still have burning questions, please leave them in the comments and we'll get you an answer.

What Is Tapioca Flour?

Tapioca flour is made from the crushed pulp of the cassava root (pictured below), a woody shrub native to South America and the Caribbean. Even though they originate from the same plant, cassava flour and tapioca flour are in fact different. Cassava flour uses the whole root while tapioca flour only uses the starchy pulp. Like other starches, tapioca flour is a very fine, white powder that works well in gluten free baking. It can replace cornstarch as a thickener for pies, gravies, pudding, dough and sauces and aids in creating a crisp crust and chewy texture in baking. It is most often used in the Brazilian treat Pão de Queijo (pictured below), a light, puffy cheese roll. Tapioca flour is becoming increasingly common in paleo diet recipes, as well.

what is tapioca flour or tapioca starch

Is Tapioca Starch the Same as Tapioca Flour? Is There a Difference Between the Two?

There are quite a variety of different tapioca products on the market. It is common for tapioca flour to sometimes be called tapioca starch. Our tapioca flour is the same thing as tapioca starch, however you need to be aware that there is a third choice called tapioca flour/starch often found in stores that cater to a Caribbean and South American clientele. This type of flour/starch is typically sold as cassava flour, but it will not work the same as our tapioca flour. To best avoid confusion, if you need to use an ingredient for gluten free baking, we recommend sticking with something that is clearly marked as tapioca starch or tapioca flour and steering clear of cassava flour.

What About Modified Tapioca Starch?

This is an entirely different ballgame of starch. Modified starch works well in gluten free baking, but it is not the same thing as our tapioca flour and they cannot be used interchangeably. Expandex produces this type of modified starch.

How Is Tapioca Flour Made?

Essentially, cassava root is peeled, washed and chopped. Then it is rasped (finely shredded) and the resulting pulp is washed, spun, and washed until the mixture is primarily pure starch and water. The starch is then dried. We recognize the hazards of under-processed cassava root and our product has been processed in an appropriate manner to make the product harmless.

Why Use Tapioca Flour?

Tapioca flour is a wonderful thickener that is superior to arrowroot starch and potato starch. It provides a crispy crust and chewy texture in gluten free baked goods. It also serves as an effective thickening agent for other recipes such as homemade pudding, cookie dough, sauces and gravies. Some people choose tapioca because they cannot eat corn or potatoes for health reasons and tapioca flour is a wonderful alternative.

Tips for Using Tapioca Flour to Replace Other Ingredients: 

  • Tapioca Flour for Cornstarch in Baking: Replace 1 tablespoon cornstarch with 2 tablespoons tapioca flour.
  • Tapioca Flour for All Purpose Flour in Thickening: Replace 1 for 1.
  • Tapioca Flour for Instant Tapioca Pearls: For every 1 tablespoon of quick-cooking tapioca pearls use 1 1/2 tablespoons of tapioca flour. Mix the tapioca flour with any dry sugar in an uncooked pie filling or make a slurry with a small amount of the liquid before heating in a pre-cooked pie filling, then slowly add the slurry back into the pie filling and continue to cook the filling at a simmer for 5-10 minutes or until the cloudiness from the tapioca flour has turned transparent.

Is Bob's Red Mill Tapioca Flour Gluten Free?

Yes, tapioca flour is naturally free from gluten. At Bob's Red Mill we take it a step further by producing it in our gluten free facility and batch testing it for gluten in our quality control laboratory.

Is Bob's Red Mill Tapioca Flour Organic?

No, our tapioca flour is not certified organic.

Is Bob's Red Mill Tapioca Flour Vegan?

Yes, our tapioca flour is suitable for a vegan diet.

Is Bob's Red Mill Tapioca Flour Sulfite-Free?

Yes, our tapioca flour is sulfite-free.

Is Bob's Red Mill Tapioca Flour Pregelatinized and What Does That Even Mean?

No, our tapioca flour is not pregelatinized. Pregelatinized means that the starch has been cooked and dried, making it ideal for quick thickening. This process is used for things like tapioca pearls to create instant puddings, salad dressings, pie fillings, etc. Grinding tapioca pearls will not produce tapioca flour. However, you can replace instant tapioca pearls with tapioca flour. If you need tips for doing so, see below.

Our Favorite Recipes Using Tapioca Flour:


113 Comments

  1. Meiri Aroca
    Hi Cassidy,
    I made a cassava bread this weekend and the recipe called for xanthan gum (1/2 tsp for 400grs of cooked cassava + 2 cups of rice flour), so was my first contact with this item, anyway, the taste of the bread was a little bitter and I am thinking if was caused by the xanthan gum.
    So, can you tell me if the use of xanthan gum can modified the taste of the food?
    Thanks for your help.
    Meiri
    Reply
    1. Cassidy Stockton
      That amount of xanthan gum should not affect the taste. I'm wondering if your rice flour or cassava has gone rancid.
      Reply
  2. Angela
    I've been looking for Non-GMO Tapioca pearls as my kids love Bobba. I noticed that you carry this but that it was not organic. Is it GMO-free? And is it classified as a modified starch?

    Btw, in the past I've bought Org Kamut cereal (hot). I haven't seen it in the stores. Do you still carry this product? I would like to order 2 cases if you do.
    Reply
    1. Cassidy Stockton
      Angela,

      At Bob’s Red Mill, we have made a commitment to purchase only non-GMO grains. All of our products are made from ingredients that were grown from identity-preserved, non-GMO seed. You can read our full non-GMO policy here: http://blog.bobsredmill.com/featured-articles/update-our-non-gmo-policy/ For more information about our GMO policy, please call our customer service team: 1-800-349-2173. I do not think this would be considered a modified starch. Yes, we do still carry the Kamut cereal. You can order it on our website at bobsredmill.com or by calling the number above.
      Reply
  3. Jayne
    Please can you tell me whether your potato starch has sulphites?
    Reply
    1. Cassidy Stockton
      Jayne,

      From what I can see from our supplier, it looks like they use suflites in the processing of potato starch and the resulting product has less than 10 parts per million. So I guess that means, yes, there is a very tiny amount of them in the potato starch.
      Reply
  4. Angela
    I like to try out new products and have purchase many of kinds of flours and grains/berries. And I intend to keep purchasing from Bob's because your good affordable organic non-gmo products. But most of all, I appreciate your companies comitment to transparency, integrity and great customer service.

    I have a concern, I just read your response that your potato starch supplier uses sulfites during the process. This is alarming as I am severly allergic to Sulfites. Can you tell me if any other your other products also use sulfites in the process. I need to know which ones to avoid.
    Reply
    1. Cassidy Stockton
      Angela,

      Are you able to give us a call at 800-349-2173 to get assistance with this inquiry?
      Reply
  5. Robert
    I think I follow the above well enough, but what action should I take when I come upon recipes authored by the same source that list tapioca flour for one and tapioca starch for the other? Take for example the booklet of included recipes for a well known bread machine maker I have here, where the "GF Chestnut Bread" calls for Tapioca Flour, but if you flip to the next page the "GF Banana Walnut Bread" recipe calls for Tapioca Starch. My thinking is that because the same recipe source is referring to the two by different names, that they intend to mean different things. I have read that in some places outside the US tapioca starch is different from the flour and that could explain this, but I have not tracked down any concrete details. I assume that for one of the tapioca's in these recipes I need to modify the BRM Tapioca with the addition of another ingredient.
    Reply
    1. Cassidy Stockton
      Robert,

      Our Tapioca Flour should work fine in either application.
      Reply
  6. Barbara
    I am on a LCHF (low carb, high fat) diet and am trying to limit my intake of carbs to 20 a day. I am wondering what the count is with tapioca flour. Thank you. I love the information you present. It is true customer service!
    Reply
    1. Cassidy Stockton
      Please visit this link to view nutritional information for Tapioca Flour: http://www.bobsredmill.com/tapioca-flour.html
      Reply
  7. Brian Montero
    Hi, is cassava starch the same as tapioca flour?
    Reply
    1. Cassidy Stockton
      Hi Brian,

      Yes, cassava starch and tapioca flour are the same thing. Cassava flour, however, is a different thing and would not be as starchy.
      Reply
  8. Jay
    Could ground up minute tapioca be used in place of tapioca starch, or are they too different in make up?
    Reply
    1. Cassidy Stockton
      I think they're too different to use that way. Most tapioca pearls have additional ingredients.
      Reply
  9. Jeni
    Hi! I have celiacs and was wondering if your tapioca pearls are gluten free! Is there a chance of cross contamination in their production?
    Thanks so much!
    Reply
    1. Cassidy Stockton
      Hi Jeni,

      No our tapioca pearls are not produced in our gluten free facility or tested for gluten. They are produced on shared lines with gluten-containing items. We do use Good Manufacturing Practices and clean lines between runs, but there is some chance of cross contact with gluten.
      Reply
  10. Connie
    Hi! I've seen, lately many chemical conscious women switching to arrowroot or tapioca flour as a finishing powder for their face. Is Bob's tapioca starch a healthy alternative to use as a cosmetic alternative? Thanks for your advice!
    Reply
    1. Cassidy Stockton
      Connie,

      Our tapioca flour is probably fine, but it's not a cosmetic ingredient, so I can't really say that it would work well as an alternative to face powder.
      Reply
  11. julanne myers
    I am looking for a Paleo waffle recipe that uses almond flour and Tapioca flour. I was told it also uses tapioca flour. How much would I use in a recipe ?
    Reply
    1. Cassidy Stockton
      I'm not sure which recipe you're looking for, but this one using almond flour to make paleo waffles looks really good: http://powerhungry.com/2015/02/easy-almond-flour-waffles-paleo-gluten-free-grain-free/
      Reply
  12. judy
    Hi. I am making 'Moxarella' cheese for the 1st time. I have come across different recipes over the years that things like use tapioca (or potato) flour NOT starch. I'm confused bc Bob's package says Tapioca Flour AKA tapioca starch. My choices (of what I have on hand) are tapioca flour AKA starch or potato starch. The recipe calls for 2T + 1 t. Am I correct to assume that the 'flour' may gummy up whereas the startch may firm up, or vice-versa? Which would you try? Thanks!
    Reply
    1. Cassidy Stockton
      Tapioca flour and tapioca starch are the same thing- essentially an extremely starchy flour. You could use either of those products- tapioca flour/starch or potato starch with the same effect. I hope this helps. The recipe I found calls for tapioca flour, so I'd probably recommend that product.
      Reply
  13. Marcia Blick
    Will you ever make the Cassava Flour , Not the starch? It is now being used as the main flour ingredient in many baked goods now the popularity is rising.
    Reply
  14. Marcia Blick
    I am commenting again in the event you are confused as reading much of this board almost had my eyes crossed. I am referring to the peeling of the root and then baking it until its dried and then the entire root is ground up until flour. Like Otto’s Cassava Flour is. Is there any future plans to offer your version? I love your products!!
    Reply
    1. Cassidy Stockton
      No, I'm sorry, we have no plans to release Cassava Flour at this time.
      Reply
  15. Alex Jag
    Do you have Tapioca Flour in 25 pounds bag?
    Reply
  16. Ann Weber
    How nourishing is tapioca flour? I notice that it is the first ingredient in the gluten free bread I buy, followed by brown rice flour.
    Reply
    1. Sarena Shasteen
      How nourishing it is depends your personal dietary needs. If you are concerned about whether it is good for you, you should consult your physician. We aren't sure what the quality of the tapioca flour in the bread you purchase is or where it comes from.
      Reply
  17. Laurie Gilmore Farley
    Laurie Gilmore Farley
    After putting my son on a strict elimination diet, we've discovered that he is sensitive to corn, dairy, and gluten. After radically changing his diet to eliminate these three things, his eczema is COMPLETELY GONE. (Miraculous!) Recently we've had a couple of flare-ups and the only new ingredient I can connect it to is Tapioca Starch. I did a little research and found mentioned that people who have latex & rubber sensitivity are likely to be sensitive to Tapioca. And yes, my son has latex sensitivity. It just sounds SO bizarre - can you please confirm if you have you ever heard of this cross-sensitivity? I'm finding that Tapioca is in more and more GF products, so not sure what to do...
    Reply
    1. Sarena Shasteen
      We haven't looked into this. It is best to go with what your doctor says when it comes to your son's sensitivities. Thank you for letting us know about the concern of cross sensitivities.
      Reply
  18. redhuan
    can i know...how can i make tapioca mix dry ,hard for crispy flour..same like shihlin or hotstars chicken?
    Reply
    1. Sarena Shasteen
      We aren't sure what you're asking about. You may want to use a google search or contact our customer service department and speak with the recipe specialist at 503-654-3215.
      Reply
  19. Suzanne Priolo
    Will this tapioca starch thicken cold homemade salad dressings?
    Reply
    1. Sarena Shasteen
      Yes, it would work perfectly to thicken your salad dressing.
      Reply
    2. K
      Can you eat this tapioca flour without cooking it?
      Reply
      1. Sarena Shasteen
        We do not recommend eating this product without cooking it.
        Reply
  20. Kathy
    I would just like to point out that while tapioca starch is a fine gluten-free alternative for most people, those with latex allergies may have cross-sensitivity to tapioca and should proceed with caution. I didn't know about this until I used a natural deodorant that contained tapioca starch and developed a nasty rash and swelling from it. I am also allergic to latex. I have also accidentally eaten a gluten-free baked good containing this ingredient and felt unwell afterward (pounding heart, bloating). Fortunately my reactions have not been severe but that possibility exists for some folks, so I wanted to spread awareness. Wishing everyone good health!
    Reply
  21. […] and washed until the mixture is starch/water. Then the starch is dried and ready for use. This is a good resource to learn about tapioca starch (tapioca flour) and more on the process for creating […]
    Reply
  22. mel
    Hi there, ty, ty, ty, for adhering to your own and our value system for our minds, bodies and souls and not allowing GMO ingredients. When I read that, I genuinely teared up because it is the cause of so many disruptive problems in the central nervous system which links to everything else in the body... I have nearly died 2X from chemical and hazardous poisons such as glyphosate which is the single most damaging problem to our soil and seed supply and am sincerely grateful to you. Again, thank you, and may you be blessed. :)
    Reply
  23. […] you are considering substituting tapioca starch for cornstarch, Bob’s Red Mill recommends 2 Tablespoons tapioca starch to 1 Tablespoon cornstarch. You can substitute instant […]
    Reply
  24. Mark
    Why when I use tapioca starch would my fillings be runny , using same recipe I have runny fillings and thick fillings?
    Reply
    1. Sarena Shasteen
      Hi Mark, we're sorry you're having trouble. We highly recommend you call and speak with our recipe specialist about this since it deals with specific recipes and different issues. You can reach her at 1-800-349-2173.
      Reply
  25. Mandolina
    I could not find Tapioca Flour at my grocery store. Can I substitute minute Tapioca? The recipie calls for. Cup of Tapioca Flour. How much thickener should I use? I’m trying to make a chewy dog treat.
    Reply
    1. Sarena Shasteen
      Hi Mandonlina, that would not work the same. We highly recommend you contact our recipe specialist for specific help for this. You can reach her at 800-349-2173.
      Reply
  26. Steph
    Is tapioca flour abrasive at all?
    Reply
    1. Sarena Shasteen
      We aren't sure what you mean? Our tapioca flour is a white powdery flour, similar in texture to Cornstarch.
      Reply
  27. Ernest Young
    I made my favorite Tapioca Pudding using this Tapioca flour in place of the pearls. I find the texture quite disgusting, and it doesn't taste good either! I truly love the texture I get with the pearls, and the taste using the same recipe is magnificent. I feel like I wasted my money and want to throw it in the garbage.
    Reply
    1. Ernest Young
      I would like to remove my comment, as it was true yesterday, but after being in the refrigerator overnight the pudding is better. I still like the pearls much better!
      Reply
    2. Sarena Shasteen
      Hi Earnest. Tapioca Pearls and Flour are not interchangeable ingredients. We would not recommend making tapioca pudding with tapioca flour.
      Reply
  28. Candace Mayer
    How does tapioca flour work as substitute for tapioca in crock pot recipes?
    Reply
    1. Sarena Shasteen
      No, since our tapioca flour is not pregelatinized it does not function in the same manner as quick-cooking tapioca pearls (eg. Minute Tapioca). Tapioca flour is a thickener and it can be used to thicken puddings and pie fillings though at different ratios than quick-cooking tapioca pearls. For every 1 Tbsp of quick-cooking tapioca pearls use 1 ½ Tbsp of tapioca flour. Mix the tapioca flour with any dry sugar in an uncooked pie filling or make a slurry with a small amount of the liquid before heating in a pre-cooked pie filling then slowly add the slurry back into the pie filling and continue to cook the filling at a simmer for 5 – 10 minutes or until the cloudiness from the tapioca flour has turned transparent.
      Reply
  29. chena
    hi there:) i read that the process of refining tapioca starch involves bleaching - is that always true? has your product been bleached or treated with any harsh chemicals? thanks!
    Reply
    1. Sarena Shasteen
      Our tapioca flour is not bleached or treated with harsh chemicals.
      Reply
  30. Denise Trombley
    I have a 9” berry pie recipe that call for
    2 Tablespoonfuls of tapioca granules and 4 Tablespoonfuls of cornstarch for thickener. Can I use my tapioca flour to replace both granules and cornstarch and if yes, how much should I use? Thank you for your help.

    Denise Trombley
    [email protected]
    Reply
    1. Whitney Barnes
      Whitney Barnes
      Hi Denise, you could replace the 2 tbsp of Tapioca Granules for 3 tbsp of Tapioca Starch. I might not recommend replacing both depending on the recipe as Tapioca Starch isn't quite as "strong" as Corn Starch.
      Reply
  31. Lorraine McIntyre
    Lorraine McIntyre
    when tapioca starch is dried, what temperature is it dried to? I am looking at this ingredient in a nut-cheese that is not cooked, and the tapioca starch is added as a stretchy thickener.
    i heard that flour is a raw product, and can have e.coli in it and wondered if tapioca flour is considered a raw ingredient too. thanks.
    Reply
    1. Whitney Barnes
      Hi Lorraine, our Tapioca Flour is not considered a raw product and has been heated to or above 118°F.
      Reply
  32. Jeanette Schandelmeier
    Jeanette Schandelmeier
    I have switched from cornstarch to arrowroot powder, but I do not like the taste, so I'm looking for another alternative. Does tapioca flour have a discernible taste?
    Reply
    1. Whitney Barnes
      Hi Jeanette, no - Tapioca Flour is very neutral in flavor.
      Reply
  33. Christina Mailer-Nastasi
    Christina Mailer-Nastasi
    Hello!

    I was wondering if 'Tapioca Flour' and 'Tapioca Starch' are truly multi-purposeful? I am going to be creating homemade tapioca pearls for a bubble tea recipe and the main ingredient called for is 'tapioca starch.' I would prefer to use Red Mill's tapioca flour, but am hesitant that the pearls would become a completely different texture after boiling in hot water for a few minutes.

    Thank you for the clarification in advance!
    Reply
    1. Whitney Barnes
      Hi Christina, Tapioca Flour and Tapioca Starch are the same product, just with multiple names. If your recipe calls for Tapioca Starch to make the tapioca pearls this is the product you're looking for. Enjoy!
      Reply
  34. Sashi
    A quick tip. This is Bob's red mill tapioca flour recommendation in this website. And in this you suggest some favorite tapioca recipes which includes wraps. But in that link, she says the tapioca flour from bobs red mill is not good. Just an FYI.
    Reply
  35. Cindy
    I have read that there can be "hidden" potato in Tapioca Starch. Is this true for your brand, or is it truly potato- free?
    Reply
    1. Whitney Barnes
      Hi Cindy, there is only tapioca in our Tapioca Starch, no potato.
      Reply
  36. Bradleyjenkins@gmail.com
    Do you guys make Quick Cooking Tapioca?
    Reply
    1. Whitney Barnes
      Hi! We carry only our Small Pearl Tapioca. It is not considered quick cooking.
      Reply
  37. Kathy Beaman
    Can this tapioca flour be substituted for white flour for bread making?

    Thankyou
    Reply
    1. Whitney Barnes
      Hi Kathy, you can use Tapioca Flour in gluten free baking but it is not a 100% replacement for white flour. The texture is similar to cornstarch; very fine and powdery. We have a great selection of recipes made with our Tapioca Flour - you can find them all here (just click on the Recipes tab!)

      Bob's Red Mill Tapioca Flour
      Reply
  38. Michele Nalu
    I have been having a hard time finding your tapioca pearls to make pudding with. I checked Kroger, Trader Joe’s, Whole Foods, and Busch’s Market in Michigan. I did find your tapioca flour and would like to know if I ca. Use that instead to make tapioca pudding.
    Reply
    1. Whitney Barnes
      Hi Michele - sorry you're having trouble finding them! Unfortunately Tapioca Pearls and Flour are not interchangeable ingredients. We would not recommend making tapioca pudding with tapioca flour.
      Reply
  39. Kristin Koontz
    You mention the ratio of replacing tapioca flour for cornstarch in baking. I have tried using this ratio in replacing cornstarch in a custard and a thickener in a fruit sauce. However, I found it became more gelatinous or "gluey" at this ratio.
    Reply
  40. susan song
    can it be eaten raw? i would like to use it in non-baking desserts if possible. thank you.
    Reply
    1. Whitney Barnes
      Hi Susan, though this flour has been heated during processing, we do not encourage eating raw as it has not gone through a heating process meant to eliminate food born illnesses here in our facilities.
      Reply
  41. Jeff
    What temperature is your Small Pearl Tapioca heated to?
    Reply
    1. Whitney Barnes
      Hi Jeff - unfortunately we don't have that information available.
      Reply
  42. DANHO Allo Mathieu Elisée
    DANHO Allo Mathieu Elisée
    I am still confused. What I want to know is simple. Is it cassava starch that gives tapioca?
    Reply
    1. Whitney Barnes
      Whitney Barnes
      Cassava is flour from the whole cassava root. Tapioca Starch is just the liquid starch that's been extracted, then dried into a powdery/flour form. I hope this answers your question but if not, our Customer Service team is happy to help. They can be reached at 1-800-349-2173 or [email protected]
      Reply
  43. Tina Rappuhn
    Thank you for this article. I have been looking for substitutes in baking for my grandson who is allergic to corn and wheat. This was clear and very helpful.
    Reply
  44. rutha pryputniewicz
    rutha pryputniewicz
    I just mixed up fresh cherries with sugar & tapioca for pie.
    I want to bake the pie tomorrow.
    Will refrigerating the fruit mix overnight affect the thickening qualifies of the tapioca?
    Reply
    1. Whitney Barnes
      Whitney Barnes
      Hi Rutha! That should still work. The Tapioca Flour will have the tendency to settle at the bottom so make sure you thoroughly stir before adding the filling into your pie crust. Enjoy!
      Reply
  45. Rhonda
    I was told by someone that bleach is used in the processing of tapioca flour. Is this true of Bob's Red Mill Tapioca Flour?
    Reply
    1. Whitney Barnes
      Hi Rhonda - No, our Tapioca Flour is not bleached or treated with harsh chemicals.
      Reply
  46. Patsy
    Can I make rice pudding with your tapioca flour and are there any recipes like this without milk, as for the B.R.A.T. diet (for treating diarrhea)?
    Reply
    1. Whitney Barnes
      Hi Patsy, most Rice Pudding recipes do not need any extra starch added; the rice itself provides enough starch to thicken. We don't have a recipe for it but you can find them online using alternative milks like almond milk, coconut milk, or soy milk. You could also use a regular Rice Pudding recipe and instead use an alternative milk rather than cow's milk.
      Reply
  47. Tina
    Can tapioca flour be used as a substitute for quick cooking tapioca in a stew that is cooked in a slow cooker? The recipe calls for 2 teaspoons of quick cooking tapioca which is sprinkled over the stew meat and vegetables.
    Reply
    1. Whitney Barnes
      Whitney Barnes
      Hi Tina - yes, Tapioca Flour can be used in this application as well. I would recommend you make a slurry with the stew liquid and Tapioca Flour first then incorporate that into the larger pot. It will thicken as it cooks. Enjoy!
      Reply
    2. Tina
      Thanks, I’ll try that!
      Reply
    3. Tina
      I forgot to ask if I should use the same amount of tapioca flour as quick cooking tapioca?
      Reply
  48. Vicki Milton
    I like quick cooking tapioca in certain pies (like peach) but I have tapioca flour too. I do not precook peach pie filling. Can I use the flour instead of quick cooking tapioca following your substitution guidelines, just mixing it with the sugar and tossing it with sliced peaches?
    Reply
    1. Whitney Barnes
      Yes - Using the above guide you can substitute Tapioca Flour for quick cooking tapioca. You don't need to precook the peach filling as it will cook, along with the tapioca flour, while it bakes. Enjoy!
      Reply
  49. Sue Hall
    I want to make my own coconut yogurt and I think it will probably need a thickener. My favorite store-bought has tapioca starch in it as the thickener. Would your tapioca flour work? If not What would you suggest??
    Your site has lots of good info. Thank you.
    Reply
    1. Whitney Barnes
      Hi Sue! Yes - our Tapioca Starch would work in that type of application. If you have more recipe questions our Customer Service team is happy to help! They can be reached at 1-800-349-2173 or [email protected] :)
      Reply
  50. Michael Rose
    Hi. Here's another application question. We are caregiving a senior relative who needs to have her liquids thickened as an aid to swallowing. We've been using "Quick Cooking Tapioca Granules" as a thickener, which seems to work quite nicely (adding it to her water, cooking it per package directions to the proper consistency and then, of course, cooling it before drinking). We're using about 1/4 cup of the instant granules daily. Can your tapioca flour be substituted? I'm thinking it might work in a similar 1:1 1/2 ratio and simmered, as in the substitution for "Instant Tapioca Pearls" in the above article. Thanks much.
    Reply
    1. Whitney Barnes
      Hi Michael - Yes, the Tapioca Starch would work to thicken a liquid, though you'd have to experiment with the ratio to get the desired consistency. I'd recommend heating water (or whatever liquid you're using) then mixing cool water and Tapioca Starch in a 2:1 ratio in a separate bowl. Whisk the slurry of cool water and Tapioca Starch until smooth then stir the slurry into the warm water. Without this step the Tapioca Starch will clump up when added to the warm water. Cool until just thickened and remove from heat.

      You could also use Arrowroot Starch, Chia Seeds, or Flaxseed Meal to thicken liquids.
      Reply

Items 1 to 50 of 58 total

Page

Add Your Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Latest Posts

Keep up to date on the latest from
Bob's Red Mill
Subscribe Now