Old Fashioned Tapioca Pudding

Alright, ‘fess up – who doesn’t love some tapioca puddin’? There’s something so comforting and nostalgic about tapioca pudding – what an even greater feeling when it’s homemade! Use Bob’s Red Mill Small Pearl Tapioca to prepare this deliciously sweet and satisfying pudding that will impress and delight even the most discerning palate. This recipe can be altered to suit dairy-free diets.

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Submitted By Bob's Red Mill Natural Foods
Old Fashioned Tapioca Pudding
Rating
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  • 3
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  • 5
Votes: 179
Rating: 3.56
You:
Rate this recipe!
Submitted By Bob's Red Mill Natural Foods
Old Fashioned Tapioca Pudding
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Ingredients
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Soak tapioca in water for 30 minutes in a 1-1/2 quart saucepan. Do not drain remaining water, if any.
  2. Add milk, salt, 1/4 cup sugar and lightly beaten egg yolks to tapioca and stir over medium heat until boiling. Simmer uncovered over very low heat for 10-15 minutes. Stir often.
  3. Beat egg whites with remaining 1/4 cup sugar until soft peaks form. Fold about 3/4 cup of hot tapioca into the egg whites, then gently fold mixture back into saucepan. Stir over low heat for about 3 minutes. Cool 15 minutes then add vanilla.
  4. Serve warm or chilled, plain or with fruits, nutmeg or coconut mixed in. Makes 3-1/2 cups (4 servings).



    * Customer Windy Walker recommends replacing up to 2/3 of the milk with coconut milk. For a dairy-free option, use soy or almond milk for the remaining 1/3 of milk.



    Customer Judith Lorraine adds mandarin oranges, flaked coconut and drained, crushed pineapple - delicious!!
Products Used in this Recipe
Recipe Comments

12 thoughts on “Old Fashioned Tapioca Pudding

  1. M. P.

    I love your Old Fashioned Tapioca Pudding recipe. Since finding it, I haven’t been tempted to go back to other recipes or buy pre-made pudding.

    I like the texture of a thicker tapioca do typically I’ll prepare the pudding without incorporating the egg whites, etc.

    In order to add a fruit flavor without adding the fruit and changing the texture, I recently tried substituting a fruit flavored syrup (similar to the Torani kind) for the sugar in the first part of the recipe. I used cherry syrup and a little almond extract instead of the vanilla. Would totally recommend it.

    Reply
  2. Maureen Nutter

    I made the recipe exactly according to directions. Then I chilled it in the refrigerator , it looked like water had settled at the bottom with the tapioca when i went to take it out..???I emptied some of the water out and remixed it but it was still watery. what did I do wrong???

    Reply
    1. Recipe Specialist

      When cooked tapioca separates, it is often times due to the under-cooking of the Tapioca Pearls. When the Tapioca Pearls are fully cooked, they will absorb and hold liquid. When they are not, they will absorb the liquid and fail to hold it when the temperature decreases. If you prepare this recipe in the future, soak the tapioca overnight. This will allow it to cook in the recommended time. You may also find that cooking the pearls longer (about 5 minutes) will aid in reducing this.

      Reply
    2. Vikki

      I accidently put vanilla extract in during soaking process. Will this ruin it from thickening? I see all recipes say to add it after it has thickened.

      Reply
      1. recipe specialist

        Hi Vikki,
        This should not keep your pudding from thickening. Vanilla is typically added at the end of the cooking process because the flavor can “cook off” when heated. You may add more vanilla after your pudding thickens if you want a stronger vanilla flavor.

        Reply
  3. Johnny Tapioca

    Possible variation: for a real treat, replace vanilla extract with a half to a full real vanilla bean. Slice in half lengthwise and use the back of the knife to scrape the seeds out. Stir seeds and casing into mixture towards the end of the simmer. Remove skin before serving.

    Reply
  4. Murline Neisz

    I made the tapioca and was concerned because it was so thick I worried I wouldn’t be able to stir the vanilla in. When my husband went to get it out of three refrigerator, it had become very loose and lost the creamy texture it had when it went in. I haven’t found other recipes that separate the eggs and then fold the egg whites in. I think that ruined the texture.

    Reply
    1. recipe specialist

      Hi Murline,
      Thank you for your comment. The whipped egg whites are folded in to the pudding in order to give it a lighter texture. If you prefer a thicker consistency, you could omit this step and leave out the whipped egg whites.

      Reply
      1. Rachel

        If you decide not to whip the egg whites, when do you add the eggs? At the beginning or after the 10-15 minutes of simmering? I know you have to temper them if adding to a hot liquid. Thanks!

        Reply
        1. recipe specialist

          Hi Rachel,
          If you want to omit the egg white step altogether, you could make the following adjustments:

          1. Stir together the milk, soaked tapioca, sugar, and salt in a medium saucepan. Bring the mixture to a boil over medium heat, stirring constantly. Reduce heat to low; simmer uncovered for 10 minutes. Stir often.
          2. Whisk 1 cup of the hot milk mixture into the beaten eggs, 2 tablespoons at a time until incorporated (whisk well while adding the hot liquid to the eggs or you’ll scramble them). Stir the egg mixture back into the remaining mixture in the saucepan until well mixed. Bring the pudding to a gentle simmer over medium-low heat stirring constantly; cook and stir 2-3 minutes longer until the pudding becomes thick enough to evenly coat the back of a metal spoon. Remove from the heat and stir in the vanilla. The pudding may be served hot or poured into serving dishes and refrigerated until cold.

          Reply
  5. Monica Will

    FYI: NEVER add FRESH (raw) pineapple or papaya to tapioca puddings. The naturally occuring enzymes in these fruits will break down the pudding every time. Canned fruits (even home canned) have been processed at a high enough temp to break down the enzymes. I am not aware of other fruits that do this, but to be on the safe side I only use fruits canned in juice .

    Reply

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