No-Knead Artisan Bread

This recipe can be found on our bags of Artisan Bread Flour.

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Votes: 129
Rating: 3.26
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Servings 16servings
Prep Time 10minutes
Cook Time 30minutes
Passive Time 10.5hours
Submitted By Bob's Red Mill Natural Foods
Rating
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Votes: 129
Rating: 3.26
You:
Rate this recipe!
Servings 16servings
Prep Time 10minutes
Cook Time 30minutes
Passive Time 10.5hours
Submitted By Bob's Red Mill Natural Foods
Share this Recipe
Share this Recipe
Ingredients
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. In a large bowl, combine flour, salt and yeast. Add water and stir until a shaggy dough forms. Cover bowl with plastic wrap. Let dough rise at room temperature for 10 hours.
  2. Preheat oven to 450ºF. Place a 4 qt. Dutch oven into the preheated oven, without lid, for 30 minutes.
  3. While Dutch oven heats, turn dough onto a well-floured surface and form into a ball with floured hands. Cover dough loosely with plastic and let rest for 30 minutes. With floured hands, place the dough into heated Dutch oven.
  4. Cover Dutch oven with its lid and bake for 30 minutes. Remove cover and bake for 12 minutes more.
  5. Remove loaf from Dutch oven and cool completely before slicing.
Products Used in this Recipe
Recipe Comments

16 thoughts on “No-Knead Artisan Bread

  1. Mary

    This recipe is fine with a few alterations . 2 teaspoons of salt is too much – 1 and a half works just fine. I also add a teaspoon of malted barley flour if I am not using artisan flour.
    Lastly I slash the dough on top with a sharp knife or a razor blade to allow it to rise further during the baking process. The addition of chopped olives and/or dried rosemary with a sprinkle of sea salt on top makes this loaf of bread special.

    Reply
  2. David Antonacci

    Fantastic result every time. Delicious bread that everyone loved. Beautiful body, texture and the bite was awesome. A real throw-back to bread from when I was a kid.

    Reply
      1. recipe specialist

        Hi Charla,
        We haven’t tried this with Gluten Free All Purpose Flour, but please let us know if you have good results!

        Reply
    1. recipe specialist

      Hi Rachel,
      You should be able to double this recipe for two loaves, though you may have to adjust the water a bit if needed.

      Reply
      1. Rick Bruner

        Hi. That was my question, too. I’ve made this recipe a few times in recent weeks, with great results. But I tried doubling the recipe this weekend, and it seems I need to also adjust the cook time, as I timed it as before, and it seemed a bit under. Any commend on that? Thanks.

        Reply
        1. recipe specialist

          Hi Rick,
          If you’re doubling the recipe to make one large loaf you’ll need to increase the cook time significantly. If you’re making two loaves, the bake time should still be about the same as baking one loaf. This could vary slightly depending on if the temperature changes in your oven (if you’re opening the door frequently to check on the bread for example). When done baking, the loaf should be a deep golden brown color and should sound hollow when you tap gently on the top of the loaf.

          Reply
  3. Kaz

    Love BRM Artisan flour and used the exact recipe, but when it came to the bake I used my pizza stone on the center rack with a cast iron frying pan on the bottom at 450 degree with a 40 minute warm up while the dough was resting. Then I slide my boule onto the pizza stone on parchment. Set over all time for 35 minutes and at 20 minutes I removed the parchment and continued for the last 15 minutes. The result(205 internal temp) was perfect crust and soft chewy inside with a taste that all who tried it loved.. Regards

    Reply
  4. Eileen

    Do you have to use artisan flour or will other flours work, i.e., white whole wheat, bread flour, us bleached flour?

    Reply
  5. Karen Hall

    Curious about what you consider “room temperature” for the initial rising … we keep our house pretty cold in the winter. My gas oven does have a “dough proofing” setting. The manual indicates only that it is below 100 degrees and “is optimum for bread proofing.”

    Reply
    1. recipe specialist

      Hi Karen,
      Room temperature would ideally be about 70°F. This dough is unique in that it has a long (10 hour) bulk fermentation period. If it proofs too quickly this can affect the flavor of the dough, so you don’t want it to get too warm too fast. If you can adjust your oven settings to an exact temperature this may be a good option, but “below 100°” is a big range, so if you can’t get it to a specific temperature you may just want to search for the warmest spot in your kitchen (maybe on top of your refrigerator?) and leave the dough there.

      Reply

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