10 Grain Levain Loaf

Levain is a French term for a yeasted bread starter. You can keep this levain alive in the refrigerator for practically forever by feeding it the flour and water amounts below once a month. Low Cal, Low Carb, No Fat, No Sugar.

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Servings 16people
Submitted By Sarah House for the Bob's Red Mill Test Kitchen
Levain is a French term for a yeasted bread starter. You can keep this levain alive in the refrigerator for practically forever by feeding it the flour and water amounts below once a month. Low Cal, Low Carb, No Fat, No Sugar.
Rating
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Servings 16people
Submitted By Sarah House for the Bob's Red Mill Test Kitchen
Levain is a French term for a yeasted bread starter. You can keep this levain alive in the refrigerator for practically forever by feeding it the flour and water amounts below once a month. Low Cal, Low Carb, No Fat, No Sugar.
Share this Recipe
Share this Recipe
Ingredients
Ingredients
Instructions
Levain
  1. In a large container, combine 2/3-cup bread mix and 1/3-cup water until well mixed using a clean wooden spoon (you may use 1/4-teaspoon yeast from the enclosed yeast packet for an extra yeast boost) . Cover with plastic or a few layers of cheesecloth and let sit at room temperature for 24 hours.
  2. The next day add 6 Tbsp of bread mix and 2 Tbsp of water and mix well using a clean wooden spoon. Keep at room temperature. Repeat daily for one week.
  3. Your levain is now ready to use! To begin a bread loaf, combine 1/4-cup of levain and mix with 1/2-cup water and 1 cup of bread mix. Mix until smooth using a clean wooden spoon. Cover and let sit at room temperature for 24 hours.
Bread
  1. Uncover the levain mixture and add 2-3/4 cups 10 Grain Bread Mix, 3/4 cup water and 3 Tbsp oil and mix until a dough forms.
  2. Knead on a lightly floured board until smooth and elastic, about 10 minutes.
  3. Transfer to a lightly oil bowl, cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled in size, 2 - 3 hours. Meanwhile, oil a 9x5-inch loaf pan.
  4. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured board and shape into a flat rectangle. Fold one long end towards the center, then the second long end. Roll gently then tuck the ends of the cylinder underneath, meeting in the middle. Place the loaf in the prepared loaf pan.
  5. Cover and let rise in a warm place until the dough has doubled in size or at least reached the top of the loaf pan, 2 - 3 hours. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 400°F. If using a baking stone, make sure to preheat it in the oven for at least 1 hour. To replicate a steam oven at home, place a castiron skillet on the bottom rack of the oven while you preheat the baking stone.
  6. Lightly dust the top of the loaf with flour and score the dough 3 or 4 times across the top of the loaf and at a 30° angle, about 1-inch apart.
  7. Place the loaf pan on the baking sheet and fill the castiron skillet with ice cubes. Quickly close the oven door and bake until dark, about 40 minutes. Let cool before slicing.
Recipe Notes

*Ingredient volumes are listed for the total amount used over a period of a week.

Products Used in this Recipe
Recipe Comments

4 thoughts on “10 Grain Levain Loaf

  1. Stephen Brown

    I’d like to know whether this dough recipe could be baked in a Pullman loaf pan. I can’t find a whole grain bread recipe for Pullman pan anywhere.

    Reply
    1. Recipe Specialist

      We have not tested this recipe in a Pullman pan. However, it is likely to work. When making this bread recipe in your Pullman pan, be mindful of how much dough this recipe will produce, how much the bread dough will rise and the volume of your pan.

      Reply
  2. Allison MacKay

    I love the old recipe for 10 grain bread, it’s not from a mix, but uses the 10 grain cereal.
    I finally found the copy I had packed away during a move, whew!
    Used to sell a lot of it at my farmer’s market, but made it a little wheatier and added flax meal.
    Ever considered creating a recipe archive?

    Reply
    1. recipe specialist

      Hi Allison,
      We actually do have a recipe archive and we are more than happy to search it for you. However, we have thousands of recipes and not all can be made available online for various reasons, so if you ever need help finding something please feel free to email us at customerservice@bobsredmill.com and try to be as specific as possible so that we can narrow down our search for you.

      Reply

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